Paaiea Pond, part 3, from the pen of J. W. H. Isaac Kihe, 1914.

SOME STORIED LANDS OF KONA

Written for the Hoku o Hawaii by ka Ohu Haaheo i na Kuahiwi Ekolu¹

PAAIEA POND

Meeting with Kolomu’o and Pahinahina.

When the woman left that place at the seaside of Kaelehuluhulu, she arrived in the uplands of Keoneeli, a place that is renown to this day called Kepuhiapele [‘the scorching of Pele’], a heap of aa lava that is almost 200 Feet high, downside of the place where J. A. MaGuire [known also as Keoni Kaimana] is living.

When the woman arrived there, there were two girls named Kolomu’o and Pahinahina broiling breadfruit, while the parents were away farming. This was a huge town during those days, with many people living there. When the woman met up with the girls broiling ulu. The woman said, “The ulu that you are cooking is done.” One of the girls responded, “We are cooking ulu, but it is not totally done.”

The woman went on, “When you ulu is cooked, who will partake of it first?” “La’i, my god, will eat first.” “So La’i is a powerful akua?” “Yes, La’i is powerful.” The name of this girl was Kolomu’o, and the area beneath that scorching of Pele is famous to this day and called Kolomu’o, and famous too is the Opelu fishing shrine [Ko’a] at the beach of Kaupulehu.

Then the woman asked the other girl, Pahinahina, “And when your ulu is done, who is it for?” “It is for Pele Honuamea, my god.” “Then it is our ulu; your ulu is cooked, let the two of us partake in it.” Pahinahina agreed, and the ulu was peeled [makikoe²] and eaten up. Continue reading

Paaiea Pond, part 2, from the pen of J. W. H. Isaac Kihe, 1914.

SOME STORIED LANDS OF KONA

Written for the Hoku o Hawaii by ka Ohu Haaheo i na Kuahiwi Ekolu¹

PAAIEA POND

The old woman replied. “I have come to the alii. I live in the uplands, and grew hungry for fish, so I got up and made the descent thinking that the Konohiki of the alii would be the friend here at the ocean side from whom I could receive something fishy to return upland with.

The Konohiki immediately answered. “Your trip will not be rewarded for the all the fish belongs to the alii.” “If I can’t have fish, then what about some palu?”² “There is no palu for you, it is for the alii. This is a work day for the alii; the people care for him, and I am placed here to oversee the wealth of the alii and the wealth of all of his dependents.”

“Both the Aku and the palu are kapu to the alii, as well as the amaama from the pond,” Kepaalani said, “they are restricted for the alii.” “If those are kapu, what about some small Aholehole or a little shrimp?” “Kahaha! Perhaps you can’t hear; all of those things are for the alii.” Continue reading

Paaiea Pond, from the pen of J. W. H. Isaac Kihe, 1914.

SOME STORIED LANDS OF KONA

Written for the Hoku o Hawaii by ka Ohu Haaheo i na Kuahiwi Ekolu¹

PAAIEA POND

Paaiea was a great pond almost like the ponds of Wainanalii and Kiholo. In the olden days, when the great ruling chiefs were living, and when these fish ponds were full of the riches of Awa, Anae, and Ahole, along with all sorts of fish which swam within.

During that time, Konohiki were stationed, and he was the guard of the pond that watched over the pond and all things, as here we are talking about Paaiea Pond which was destroyed by lava and became pahoehoe lava which remains today, which is what the writer is introducing to the readers of the Hoku o Hawaii.

In the correct and trues story of this pond, its boundaries began from Kaelehuluhulu on the north and on the south was at the place called Wawaloli, and the distance from one end to the other was 3 miles or more, and that was the length of this pond; and today within these boundaries, there are a number of pools [lua wai loko] remaining during this time that the writer is speaking before the readers of the Hoku.

The great Overseer [Konohiki] who cared for this pond was Kepaalani, and everything fell under him: the storehouses [hale papaa] where poi and fish were stored, the halau for the fishing canoes, the nets and all thing, and from him the fishermen and the retainers of the court would obtain their sustenance.

And at this time when the pond was destroyed by lava, Kamehameha was residing in Hilo for the purpose of waging war, and this war was called Kaipalaoa; during this war, Namakehaikalani died and was offered atop the Heiau of Piihonua in Hilo; and this was Kamehameha’s final war, and his enemies lived quietly without uprising once again. This was the time between 1798 until 1801, and it is said that this is when lava destroyed this pond that was full of riches, and turned it into a land of pahoehoe lava which remains to this day. Continue reading

Two paintings by Joseph Nawahi, 1877.

[Found under: “NA ANOAI.”]

When it was made known that Lava was erupting once again, along with it came the painting done by our good friend, the Hon. J. Nawahi; seen is the fiery red from Hilo, lighting up the walls of the heavens; and that painting can be seen in Whitney’s [bookstore] window. But this past Thursday, our famous seer artist did a painting of the fires of that woman of the pit, with the many Hiiaka aumakua igniting that fiery hot imu. Perhaps this is what some of our readers are saying; “the lava has reignited because of the aumakua;” that is ignorant. See this painting right outside of the printing office of the Pacific Commercial Advertiser [Kalepa].

[After that Antique Roadshow episode in 2007, nearly everyone knows about that painting of Hilo done by Joseph Nawahi now hanging up at Kamehameha Schools. I believe that these two however are not known today. Anyone have any ideas?]

(Lahui Hawaii, 2/22/1877, p. 3)

I ka wa i hoike ia mai ai...

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke III, Helu 8, Aoao 3. Feberuari 22, 1877.

Alika, South Kona, 1886.

The story of how Alika was named.

Alika was a man and Hina was his wahine, and their occupation was farming. Before they would begin farming, they would vow that should their crops mature, they would consume it along with Pele, the god. But when the crops reached maturity, the two of them didn’t carry out their promise, and the day that they ate of their crops, that was when they soon died.

This is how it happened: Hina urged Alika to eat sweet potato, and so Alika went to dig up some, and after finding some, he baked it in the umu¹ until done and then they ate it all; then the forest began to speak as if it were a man, echoing all about them. During which time, the man soon thought of their vow. Alika said to Hina, “We will die because of you,” and before he was done speaking, lava soon flamed forth and they perished.

And it is for this man that this land is called by that name until this day; if you look at the aftermath of the lava, in this area, the burnt homes of Kaupo stand jagged because of the spreading flames²; the land is horrid in appearance in every way; but the kamaaina love it here, and it is only the malihini who disparage it.

Pohakuekaha was the aikane of Alika and Ko-aka; Kiapea was the woman of all of them; they died and their bodies transformed into rocks; Pohakuekaha is a stone that is visited often by malihini who are in the area.

The amazing thing about this rock is that if the visitor climbs atop of the rock and throws pebbles into the sea, the sea will turn rough, but not in any other area, just right there.

As for Ko-aka, if the sea is calm right above it, during low tide, this is a sign that will be rough seas; this rock is now located in down in the deep, while Pohakuekaha is on the sand.

These things above deal with the story of this land as was heard by Kahinalua, the kamaaina of this place.

Yours truly,

M. K. KIAMOKU

Alika, S. Kona, Hawaii.

¹Umu is another word for imu, the underground oven (as in the name, Kaumualii).

²I am not sure if this is a reference to the actual place called Kaupo in South Kona, or to the famous saying “Kū ke ʻā i ka hale o Kaupō” from the story of Pāmano…

(Kuokoa, 8/7/1886, p. 3)

Ka moolelo i loaa ai ka inoa Alika.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXV, Helu 32, Aoao 3. Augate 7, 1886.

Play of Pele and Lohiau at Hawaii Theater, 1925.

Tableau of the Hawaiian Dramatic Club

The Tableau of Pele and Lohiau shown in the Hawaii Theater [Halekeaka Hawaii] last Friday by the Hawaiian Dramatic Club. The play will be shown at Los Angeles, on the journey of the Royal Order of Kamehameha [Ahahui Kamehameha] for the city day coming up in June.

(Kuokoa, 4/23/1925, p. 5)

Tabalo a ka Haw'n Dramatic Club

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 17, Aoao 5. Aperila 23, 1925.

More plays! 1925.

TABLEAU OF PELE AND LOHIAU

This play was shown at Waikiki Park on this past Saturday, and will be shown again on this Satrday night. From the left to the right—Alice Malahea, Lydia Holt, William Smith, Abbie Lincoln.

[This is another i wish i could have seen! This is a repost from the abandoned Hoolaupai Facebook page of times past. I like the format of http://nupepa-hawaii.com because it is very easily searched!]

(Kuokoa, 5/21/1925, p. 5)

KE TABALO O PELE AME LOHIAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 21, Aoao 5. Mei 21, 1925.

Lava destroys the village of Hoopuloa, Kona. 1926.

The Harbor of Hoopuloa is Destroyed by Lava.

On this past Sunday [4/18/1926], the fire of woman of Mokuaweoweo appeared and reached the sea and it swept aside the things blocking its path. When it got close to the upland of Hoopuloa, the flow of lava separated into two, and one of the flows went straight for the village of Hoopuloa and the harbor, and the second flow went towards the village of Milolii. The fiery lava engulfed the harbor and village of Hoopuloa, and now they are but a heap of pahoehoe lava.

According to eyewitnesses of this engulfing lava, it was frightening seeing the lava coming down, and others say that it was truly awesome watching the flowing lava and its sweeping aside of all obstructions in its path.

The last word heard before the the Hoku went to the press was that this Wondrous Woman of Halemaumau returned to her Palace at Kilauea, and she is bringing to life her fires at the famed crater of Halemaumau.

Perhaps her rage has been quenched as the skin of that woman has touched the sea, but the memory of the tragedy which befell the people of that section of Kona is heartbreaking.

[And check out this awesome picture of the tragic event taken by Tai Sing Loo, put up by the Hawaiian Historical Society!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/20/1926, p. 2)

Pau ka Uwapo o Hoopuloa i ke Ahi Pele

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XIX, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Aperila 20, 1926.

Pretty cool map of Honolulu, 1845.

HONOLULU.

In the picture above, clear are the yards and streets, and the layout of Honolulu, the great city of Hawaii. Here is where the King lives permanently, as well as the Prime Minister, and the Nation’s Legislature.

By the numbers on the picture, each place is clearly recognized, Thusly:

1. Residence of the King.

2. Fort, where the Governor lives.

3. Church of the King at Kawaiahao, where Armstrong preaches salvation.

4. Catholic Church, of Maigret them.

5. Smith’s Church at Kaumakapili.

6. Haole church at Polelewa, of Damon

7. School of the Young Chiefs

8. Hotel, “welcoming house”.

9. Government building at Honolulu.

10. Government printing house.

11. Haole school.

12. Store of Brewer them.

13. Store of Pele [Bell?] them.

14. Infirmary for the sailors from America.

15. Infirmary for the sailors from Britain.

16. Infirmary for the sailors from France.

17. British Consulate.

18. American Consulate.

19. French Consulate.

20. Building of the American diplomats.

21. House of Damon the pastor of the sailors.

22. Street going to Nuuanu.

23. Street going to Ewa.

24. Street going to Waikiki.

25. Inner Harbor.

26. French Hotel.

27. Place of the American missionaries.

This is the number of stores in Honolulu.

Clothiers, 11.

Small shops, 14.

Auction houses, 2.

Hotels, 5.

Establishments not selling liquor, 6

Saloons, 6.

(Elele, 10/7/1845, pp. 105–106.)

HONOLULU.

Ka Elele, Buke 1, Pepa 14, Aoao 105-106. Okatoba 7, 1845.