Queen Liliuokalani being tried in military court, 1895.

MILITARY COURT.

Most of the previous week was spent trying just one case, that of V. V. Ashford, accused of misprision of treason [huna kipi]. He denied the charges, and defense witnesses were brought in. The defendant was also brought in to defend himself, however, the defense Lawyer did not had no planned words for the benefit of his client, and he was continuiously questioned for four days and more. But he put a request before the Military Court [Aha Koa] to release the prisoner [lawehala]. The Lawyer for the public for the Military Court will weigh the testimony of the accused and the testimony of the people, and will sentence the offender. His ruling of case is being considered.

When the Military Court convened in the afternoon of February 1, those imprisoned under the charge of treason: Keki, Keoho, Tommy Ai, Nameless [Listed as Olii in 2/1/1895 Hawaiian Star.], John Piko, W. Kekoa, Kaanaana, Ulukou, Elia, Sam Hookano, Kahikikolu, Koia Kapena, Waianae, Keawe, Hikileo, George Makalena, Kamae, Kalawalu, James H. Bush, Buff Moepali, Manuel Rosa, and John H. Wise.

Each of them were asked if they wanted a lawyer. Twenty-one of them answered in the negative, saying that they did not want a lawyer, and J. H. Wise was the only one who wanted to be defended by the attorney Neumann. Therefore Wise’s case was postponed to a later date, and he was taken out.

Ulukou was the only one of the prisoners who objected to Captain Camara sitting to judge, and Camara was dismissed from sitting on the Commission. The remaining members of the Military Commission were not objected to.

The charges were read, and each were asked for their response. The first seven named admitted to their guilt, and the rest denied the charges. With the questioning of the witnesses, it was made clear that they were only on the outside of the military camp where the weapons were ministered to, however, according to some people, they were urged and enticed, and that is the reason some of them went to the area of the military camp. Their verdict is being considered.

At 11:15 midday of Tuesday, February 5, Liliuokalani Dominis was taken from her room where she is held prisoner in the Executive Building [Iolani Palace], to the grand Room [throne room] where the Military Trials are being held, filled with spectators. Major Potter escorted Mrs. Dominis accompanied to the door by Mrs. C. B. Wilson, then Lieutenant Kenake brought her in and sat her to the left of her lawyer Neumann. Mrs. Dominis was wearing a black dress with a hat of the same color, and her honor and royal dignity of when she sat upon the throne had fallen and shattered. The charges were read to Mrs. Dominis, of the crime she was accused of, misprision of treason, however her attorney was criticized for asking that the trial be postponed until another day. On the following Wednesday and Thursday were the responses of the prisoner and the witnesses. Mrs. Dominis vehemently denied any knowledge of the planning for war, but did admit to appointing a new cabinet of Ministers for herself.

[When looking at anything, like this article, it is important to try and understand the context. The Kuokoa, during this period at least, seems to be pro-annexation and pro-American. By reading this and the rest of its pages, you can see it is definitely not pro-Monarchy!

What were the other Hawaiian-Language Newspapers saying? The Oiaio, which was a weekly, issued a paper on 1/4/1895, and only after 10 weeks, on 3/15/1895, did it/could it print its next issue. Leo o ka Lahui, a daily which printed from Mondays through Fridays, printed an issue on 1/4/1895, and stopped/was stopped from printing until 3/12/1895 (although this issue seems not extant). What were the other English-language newspapers saying? What were the other language papers reporting?]

(Kuokoa, 2/9/1895, p. 2)

KA AHA HOOKOLOKOLO KOA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIV, Helu 6, Aoao 2. Feberuari 9, 1895.

A mele for Grover Cleveland, 1894.

KA HOOLA O KA KAHUI [sic] HAWAII

He ohohia nui loa
Nou e Kalivalana
Peresidena oikelakela
Kaulana me ke kiekie
O ka puuwai hao kila
O ka naauao lua ole
Pookela oe o ka nani
O ka manao akea
No ka ninau lahui
O ka Pae Aina Hawaii
Kau olelo hooholo
E hoi o Liliuokalani
Ma Kona Noho Kalaunu
O ke Aupuni Moi
Mai a Kamehameha mai
Piha olioli na moku
Ia oe e Kalivalana
Hauoli na puuwai
O ka Lahui Hawaii
I ke aloha kamahao
O Amerika Huiia
Lohea he leo aloha
Mai Wasinetona mai
Lanakila oikelakela
Ka Aoao Demokarata
Haneri a oi aku
Na kakoo o Hawaii
Puhi i na Pi Gi
Na hoohui aina
Ua haule na ikaika
A ka poe lehelehe wale
E ka Lahui Hawaii
E i ae hoi ka Hoola
Ke kuokoa mau loa
No Hawaii Aina
Lahui me ka Moi
E o e Kalivalana
I kou inoa hiwahiwa
“Ka Wiwo ole o na Wiwo ole
Ka makuakane o Hawaii
Ka Puuhonua o ka Pakipika
E noho ana i ka puuwai
O ka Lahui Hawaii.”

W. L. Kaleiakalahui.

[THE SAVIOR OF THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE

There is great delight
For you O Cleveland
The greatest President
Famous and exalted
With heart of steel
An intelligence second to none
You are in the heights of splendor
With open mind
On the question of the people
Of the Hawaiian Archipelago
Your decision
To return Liliuokalani
To Her Throne
Of the Monarchy
From Kamehameha
The islands are filled with joy
For you O Cleveland
Hearts are happy
Of the Hawaiian People
With wonderful love
Of the United States of America
A voice of aloha has been heard
From Washington
Great Victory
The Democratic Party
Hundred or more
Were the supporters of Hawaii
Blown away were the Provisional Government
The annexationists
The powerful have fallen
The people who are all mouth
O Hawaiian Nation
The Savior says
Let there be never-ending independence
For the Land of Hawaii
The People and the Sovereign
Answer O Cleveland
Your precious name song
“The Fearless one amongst Fearless ones
The father of Hawaii
The Refuge of the Pacific
Living in the hearts
Of the Hawaiian People.”

W. L. Kaleiakalahui.

The attitude of the Hawaiian nation towards Grover Cleveland on the most part was and is (as seen recently) much different than towards his successor, William McKinley.]

(Nupepa Aloha Aina, 3/17/1894, p. 3)

KA HOOLA O KA KAHUI HAWAII

Nupepa Aloha Aina, Buke I, Helu 11, Aoao 3. Maraki 17, 1894.

Another “Memoirs of Obookiah” translation, 1867.

Book of the Moolelo of Heneri Opukahaia.

We are printing below the first pages of and the Table of Contents of the Chapters of the story of this Hawaiian that was educated in America. In this book is seven chapters, and it is almost a hundred pages. It is being printed in America and it will be here in a few more months.

THE STORY OF HENERI OPUKAHAIA—Born in Hawaii, A. D. 1787, and Died in America, February 17, 1818—The First Fruit of Hawaii nei. Printed by the American Tract Society [Amerika Ahahui Teraka], New York, 1867.

INTRODUCTION.

The majority of this Moolelo was translated from a book published in English in the United States of America. However, information was researched, and some of the errors of the book was corrected. Some things were added from the moolelo that Rev. S. W. Papalua investigated at Kealakeakua, Hawaii.

This story of Heneri Opukahaia is something important to us Hawaiians; for this is the first of the miracles that God performed benevolently upon our People; and through this start, the enlightenment, the knowledge, and the righteousness of Hawaii has increased until this day.

Should this moolelo become something which increases our love for God and our glorification of Jehovah, that will be enough…

[A couple of years later in 1867, the original translation was appended to and corrected with the information collected by that same S. W. Papaula of Napoopoo, and published in book form under the title: “KA MOOLELO O HENERI OPUKAHAIA, UA HANAUIA MA HAWAII, M. H. 1787, A UA MAKE MA AMERIKA, FEBERUARI 17, 1818. OIA KA HUA MUA O HAWAII NEI.”]

(Kuokoa, 5/18/1867, p. 3)

Buke Moolelo o Heneri Opukahaia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 20, Aoao 3. Mei 18, 1867.

More on Opukahaia, 1865.

The Story of Opukahaia.

Keau was the father, Kamohoula was the mother. From the two was born this child, Opukahaia, along with another younger child (the name of that child is not known). Opukahaia was born soon before the battle between Kamehameha and Namakeha at Kau. And at Kau in Ninole, is where Opukahaia was born. He was named for the slitting of the stomach of a certain alii, and that is why he was called Opukahaia [“the cutting of the stomach”].

When the time of warfare between Kamehameha and Namakeha arrived, the parents of Opukahaia were killed. When his parents were killed, Opukahaia fled Kau, and went to Kohala.

While he lived in Kohala, Opukahaia was found by Pahua, the brother of his mother, and he was returned here to Kona, and lived with Puhua them and Hina them here in Napoopoo, South Kona, Hawaii.

The time when Opukahaia was living here in Napoopoo, when he was brought back from Kohala, he was an adult at the time. While he lived here, to him belonged the occupation of the kahuna of the olden days. Opukahaia was obedient; he was however not a farmer nor a fisherman, for he was not taught much about those things. He really just wanted to be taught kahuna things, and this was something that he was very interested in doing constantly, on sacred nights of Prayer [? Hainapule]. The one who taught him the ways of the kahuna was Pahua. He was a skilled kahuna taught by Hewahewa, the Great Kahuna of the Heiau of Hikiau.

After Opukahaia received the knowledge of the occupation of the kahuna, he constructed his stone Heiau within Helehelekalani, and he built a house atop his heiau, while he worshiped three gods. 1. Lono, 2. Kukaohiakala, 3. Kukailimoku.

He was constantly honing his skills, until he left for America.

When the American trading ship appeared here at Kealakekua, he was prodded by a haole aboard the ship, named Mika Alani, who was an aikane of Hewahewa; and so he went and left the work that he was trained in.

And at this Heiau which he built, he planted three coconuts, and they are growing and fruiting. The cave [? pao] of this boy, Opukahaia, can be seen by those who visit here. His relative still lives here in South Kona, her name is Hina; she is gray-haired and is frail now.

This is a short story of what is heard of Opukahaia. With mahalo.

S. W. Papaula.

Napoopoo, S. Kona, Oct. 10, 1865.

[This seems to be written in response to the translation being published in Kuokoa at the same period. Papaula is adding to the information given in the translation. This ability to quickly add to or correct information published in the newspapers was one of the many advantages newspapers had over books.]

(Kuokoa, 11/4/1865, p. 4)

Moolelo no Opukahaia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 44, Aoao 4. Novemaba 4, 1865.

Mild hula ku’i and California Midwinter International Exposition, 1894.

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The S. S. Australia Carries the Hawaiian Exhibit.

The departure of the S. S. Australia for the Coast was delayed until nearly 1 o’clock on account of the late arrival at the Oceanic wharf of articles to be exhibited at the Midwinter Fair in San Francisco, which has already opened. Among the numerous exhibits to be seen on the steamer were boxes of large and small coffee plants, boxes of large and small tea trees, brought from Hamakua, two wooden tanks containing different varieties of fish, including eels, a small shark, squid and crabs. The last two species were in one tank, and it is believed there will be a circus started between them when the aquarium is shaken up. There were two monster bullocks in stalls lashed near the stern. Kapahee, the famous surf rider, with his board, his wife and son, three hula girls and four other natives comprise part of the Hawaiian exhibit. Kapahee will give exhibitions in surf riding near the Cliff House, and if the water is clear he will dive and kill fish with a spear he has taken with him. He will also ride the bullocks. The girls under the management of D. Kaahanui will dance a mild hula-kui, while the others will assist about the grounds. Mr. L. A. Thurston superintends the exhibit.

Mrs. J. K. Ailau will make a first-class exhibition of Hawaiian curios at the fair in connection with the Hawaiian exhibit. She has taken with her four young ladies to act as saleswomen.

Messrs. Samuel Parker and A. P. Peterson were passengers on the Australia for the Coast on business bent.

Mr. W. P. Boyd, U. S. Vice-Consul-General, and wife were also passengers. They have gone to spend their honeymoon in the States. Both were gaily bedecked with leis and evergreens.

Miss Kate Cornwell, H. A. Widemann, Jr., F. M. Hatch and L. A. Thurston also left.

Mrs. and Miss Gerber, with their friend Miss A. Cahill, who lately returned from the Volcano, were among the departing throng. Mrs. Gerber and daughter left for home after a short and pleasant vacation on the islands.

Nearly all the passengers were covered with Hawaii’s tropical adieu, viz., wreaths and flowers. The P. G. band played previous and up to the departing of the steamer, and the scene on the wharf was one of bustle and excitement.

(Daily Bulletin, 1/6/1894, p. 2)

DEPARTING FRIENDS.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume VII, Number 924, Page 2. January 6, 1894.

The Hawaiian Moses? 1893.

“THE MISTAKES OF MOSES.”

We refer, of course, to the Hawaiian political Moses, who has recently broken camp, and set the faithful in motion through sea, desert and wilderness to the Land of Promise, beyond the shadow of the Throne. Yes! We refer to the Hawaiian political Moses, but whether his other name is Dole or Thurston, has not, at this writing, fully transpired. Still, the doubt as to his other name is a merely nominal doubt, not affecting the merits of the case. And as the original state—man of that name was not gifted with immunity from error, so neither has the Hawaiian Moses, even during his very brief pilgrimage, avoided all mistakes. It should ever be the part of a friend to note his friends’ infirmities, and, by bringing them mildly to their authors’ notice, suggest their reform, or convey a warning against their repetition.

———

We are all aware of the high pressure of seeming necessity under which the present government was formed. We can therefore appreciate, to some extent, the causes of the neglect to observe, towards the numerous Native element, those marks of regard and confidence without which no government can hope to endure in Hawaii. We repeat, that the pressure of the occasion must be the excuse of the gentlemen at the head of the movement for their seemingly unfriendly, and even hostile attitude toward the entire Native race, in the ordering of early events under the new dispensation.

———

The exclusion of Hawaiians from a participation in the beneficent project not only seemed, but was, and is complete. There may have been, and no doubt were reasons, seemingly sound to those who adopted them, for such a course,—reasons of which the public cannot judge, because the public know them not. Yet it would seem that one of two propositions must be true; viz.: either the Hawaiians were needlessly, and, therefore, harshly excluded from such participation in the reforming of their own government, or else the entire race were deemed by the leaders to be unfit to participate in such an enterprise.

———

If the former of the above propositions be true, one would naturally expect the mistake to be rectified at the earliest opportunity. That it has not been rectified would seem to stamp it as having been no mistake, but a course deliberately adopted, for, note the opportunity to retrieve the error, (if error it had been thought to be) in the filling of the four vacancies in the Advisory Council, on the 21st inst. It was then, as seems to us, the manifest duty of the government to seek out and appoint to those vacancies, men of Hawaiian blood, whose brains, interests and loyalty to the new idea bespoke than as deserving of such honor and confidence.

———

The failure of the government to attempt to bring even one Hawaiian to a seat at the Council Board is susceptible of only one of two meanings:—1st, that no Hawaiian could be found possessing those qualifications, or, 2nd, that the government were determined to ignore and exclude them, in any event.

———

If such exclusion was premeditated and malicious, the less said of it the better, as it is self-condemnatory. If on the other hand, there be no native Hawaiian fit to occupy a seat in the government councils, with what degree of candor or confidence can the Provisional Government request of expect the United States to incorporate our country into itself? What a commentary upon that request is the action of the government itself, in thus excluding from their confidence the entire aboriginal race, more completely than the Mongolian is now excluded from the Union. Forty odd thousand Hawaiians on these shores, and not one, (in the opinion of the government,) entitled or qualified to have a voice in the government of his native land. What a text for the American enemies of annexation, and how they will use it!

(Liberal, 1/25/1893, p. 2)

"THE MISTAKES OF MOSES."

The Liberal, Volume I, Number 39, Page 2. January 25, 1893.

Annexation or not? 1893.

[Found under: “THIS AND THAT.”]

There is much talk these day; some say that there is no way that the United States of America will listen to the request of the Commission to annex Hawaii, being that there is no Native Hawaiian of the land asking for this. Some say that a Republic will be established if the U. S. doesn’t agree.

(Liberal, 1/25/1893, p. 4)

He nui na olelo o keia mau la...

The Liberal, Volume I, Number 39, Page 4. January 25, 1893.

More mele and coverage of the Waimea cowboys, 1908.

ROPING GLORY FOLLOWS THE FLAG

If the wail had come from Boston, or from Bangor, or Podunk,
There’d have been a precious diff’rence in the thoughts we would have thunk,
But for Rochester, in New York State, to go and make a break
About these most important isles—it really takes the cake!

There’s a paper in dear Rochester that tries to stir the nation
With a statement that most clearly shows a lack of observation,
For it says Americans have lost their cowboy reputation
To Purdy from Hawaii (read below for information).

Since Hawaii’s in the U. S. A., I cannot understand
Why she thus should be referred to as a sort of foreign land;
The lariat laurel still adorns a brow American
In fair Hawaii, U. S. A., and Purdy is the man!

Says the Rochester, N. Y., Post Express:

For the first time in the history of the Frontier Day sports at Cheyenne, the championship for steer roping has been taken away from the United States Ikua Purdy, a Hawaiian cowboy, carried off first honors in the steer roping contest, defeating the crack American cowboys. For the benefit of readers who are interested in this strictly American contest, the following description of the winning of the championship is extracted from the Denver “Republican:”

At first the Americans laughed at the Hawaiians. The laugh was changed to admiration, however, when Archie Kaaua roped in the fast time of 1:09, defeating the best previous performance of 1:11 by Peter Dickerson of Arizona. Then came the champion, Purdy, and when he had tied his steer securely, the judges announced his time as 1:03 2-5. A mighty cheer greeted him. By this time the Americans had not only the greates respect for the dark-skinned visitors, but they feared them and predicted they would win. The next day Purdy, Kaaua, Hugh Clark, of Cheyenne, and Peter Dickerson, the only men qualifying for the finals roped. Kaaua roped in the slow time of 1:48 1-5, and the Americans took hope. Then Dickerson fell down and got no time. Then Hugh Clark roped in 1:20. This left Champion Purdy with the best time of 1:03 2-5, but he had to rope another steer. Excitement was at fever heat, for Clark had attained the best average for the three days up to this time. Finally Purdy’s steer was turned out of the corral, and with a dash Purdy was after him. Purdy made a perfect throw, “busted” his steer, and, slipping from his horse, ran quickly to the fallen animal and in a twinkling had “hog-tied.” A great shout went up when the time was announced at 56 seconds, and Purdy declared the winner and holder of the championship title. Clark won second, Kaaua third and Dickerson fourth.

And so the Hawaiians are the best cowboys! This is tremendously important—more so, in fact, than the result of the Marathon race or winning the greater number of points in an Olympic contest. No one country has enjoyed a monopoly of the sport of foot-racing, pole jumping, hurdling, or tug-of-waring, but America did have a monopoly of wild horse riding, steer roping and all the sports and exercises in which the frontiersman and the cowboy took part. It is rather galling, therefore, to have this honor taken from us. But, after all, there is the consoling thought that if the United States is to lose the steer-tying championship, it is won by the natives of an island that is protected by the Stars and Stripes. And what is even of more importance, the Westerners are such good sportsmen that they have not uttered a word of complaint regarding their defeat.

(Hawaiian Star, 9/23/1908, p. 6)

ROPING GLORY FOLLOWS THE FLAG

The Hawaiian Star, Volume XVI, Number 5143, Page 6. September 23, 1908.

Updated Elepaio Story, 1894.

DON’T WORRY.

O Hawaiian people, don’t worry and don’t be uncertain. for we have publicly shown that there are three great powers of the world who have granted independence to us in 1843, that being France, Britain, and America.

But when our land was stolen and our beloved Queen was taken from her throne and our land stood bare without any beauty remaining,

During that time, we composed our protest, along with Queen Liliuokalani, and left if for America to make right; and it for this that we wait until today. But O Nation, do recall one of the famous stories of our beloved land, this being:

The bird called Elepaio called out loudly:

“O Io, O Io, I was hit by the rock of the man.”

Io answered, “Who was at fault?”

“I was wrong for pecking at the huewai of the man,” answered Elepaio.

“You are indeed at fault for puncturing the huewai of the man; let it be judged by the many birds,” was Io’s answer.

It was so, Elepaio was judged; he came upon Oo, and his answer was the same, that it be judged by the many birds.

Elepaio arrived before Pueonuiokona, and his answer was the same.

But Pueonuiokona went on to say, “Say Elepaio, I will call our many fellow birds to come together.”

In no time, all the birds came together, and Pueonuiokona revealed the reason for them being called to assemble, like this:

“Before me appeared your younger sibling with his protest, and when I heard correctly, I knew he was wrong, however, the best thing to do would be for us to send Iwa before the man to whom belonged the huewai that Elepaio pecked, and to tell him that Elepaio was guilty, and it is for him to set the punishment.”

And it was so, Iwa went to the place of the man to whom belonged the huewai, and told him of their decision; this is what the man said:

“You are forgiven, and don’t do anymore harmful acts.”

So we compare this story with the actions carried out upon us, and we see that they are exactly the same.

For America totally blames itself for the wrong done by Elepaio to our huewai.

But it is going around being judged by the many birds, and is currently in Europe.

So therefore, O Nation, we will receive a fair judgement from Iwa, the messenger that is being sent; and that will be when the dignity shall be awarded to our side through the judgement of the crimes carried out by Stevens Elepaio.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 10/11/1894, p. 2)

MAI HOPOHOPO OUKOU.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 1047, Aoao 2. Okatoba 11, 1894.

Restoration Celebration at Luakaha, in Nuuanu, 1843.

FEAST OF THE KING.

Here is the food that M. Kekuanaoaʻs overseers [konohiki] contributed for the feast of the King upland of Nuuanu at Luakaha on the 3rd of August.

Mahuka, 2 pigs, 3 chickens, 53 coconuts. Maalaiki, 1 chicken. Hanakauluna, 2 chicken. Kanana, 1 chicken. Nui, 1 pig, 1 basket of sweet potato. Kumupala, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 5 sweet potato, 5 taro. Kauwai, 1 chicken. Nalapauwahiole, 2 chicken, 6 taro. Kaluahinenui, 1 lau [400] fish, 36 coconuts. Mu, 1 pig. Kanoa, 37 coconuts. Makahopu, 1 chicken. Nailimai, 1 chicken. Nahalelauhala, 2 chicken. Puuloa, 1 chicken. Kalalawalu, 1 pig. Kaohe, 1 chicken. Kaleimakalii, 1 chicken. Kepu, 2 chicken. Kinopu, 1 pig. Hueu, 2 chicken. Napohaku, 1 chicken. Kaaua, 2 pigs, 1 chicken, 1 turkey, 2 ducks, 120 fish. Koiamai, 1 chicken. Nalino, 2 chicken. Kamaukoli, 1 pig, 4 poi, 120 fish. Paele, 1 chicken, 5 baskets of sweet potato [kiki uala], 10 taro. Kahakuailii, 1 chicken. Kaaipuna, 1 chicken, 1 duck. Polikua, 2 pigs. Kikaha, 1 pig. Kekoaalohiu, 1 pig. Kaiwi, 1 chicken. Kaniho, 1 pig, 2 poi. Kawahinelawaia, 1 chicken. Kahanamoku, 1 pig. Kapoo, 1 chicken. Kaluhia, 3 chicken. Makahuluhulu, 1 chicken. Keliikumoku, 1 poi. Kokahi, 1 pig. Honaunau, 1 pig, 55 taro.

Here is the food that Kamehameha’s very own konohiki contributed for his feast.

Wiliama, T. 1 pig, 2 poi, 8 fish, 1 chicken. G. P. Judd, 2 pig, 7 poi, 8 fish. Kanoa, 1 pig. Huakini, 1 pig. Wahahee, 1 pig, 6 taro. Kekai, 1 poi, 50 fish. Kanaina, 1 pig. Kalama, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 6 taro, 1 poi, 1 basket of sweet potato. Namakeha, 1 chicken, 1 poi. Keohokalole, 2 pig, 27 coconuts. Kalaimoku, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaaoao, 1 poi. Kalunaaina, 1 pig, 1 poi. Kamakahonu, 30 fish. Namauu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Piikoi, 2 poi, 1 duck, 1 pig, 10 fish. Papa, 4 sweet potato. Kealakai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Nakoa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaeo, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kailiwai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kelama, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kanewili, 1 poi. Kapu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Koa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kahoe, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Lahilahi, 1 pig, 1 poi. Haole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Ulunui, 4 fish. Ulualoha, 1 pig. Kale, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Hinau, 1 poi. Makole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kuaana, 2 poi, 20 fish. He 60 fish. Kuke, 1 pig, 1 poi. Punahele, 1 poi, 10 fish. Alapai, 1 pig. Kala, 1 poi, 1 pig. Kahaaualii, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kamokuholohewa, 1 poi. Kekuaiwahia, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Puhalahua, 1 pig, 1 chicken. Ioane Ii, 2 pig, 1 chicken, 2 turkey. Kanina, 1 pig. Kaawahua, 1 poi, grapes. Maalahia, 1 poi, grapes. Kaapuiki, 1 chicken. Kaihiwa, 1 pig. Keaniani, 1 pig. Kaaha, 1 pig. Kaunuohua, 300 lemons.

Those were the konohiki who contributed to the king’s celebratory feast, and there were many konohiki of the King and M. Kekuanaoa who did not contribute to this celebratory feast of the king for the return of the land to him. And these konohiki who did not contribute, are without aloha, and without joy for the return of the nation to our king.

At perhaps 11 o’clock was when the King went up with his men in their …

(Nonanona, 8/5/1843, p. 28)

AHAAINA A KE LII.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 28. Augate 8, 1843.

glory; and the haole of the warships, in their best; and the musicians. And when they reached the uplands and entered into the grass house [hale pili], that was when the celebration began with music.

When the food was ready on the table spread over with greenery, it was 32 feet long and 2 feet wide. And the amount of food placed on this table was: 60 pigs, 300 chicken, 40 turkeys, 58 ducks. With all the supplies necessary to prepare this food; Kamamalu 1 set of supplies [? ukana], Lota 1 ukana; Liholiho 1 ukana; Mose 1 ukana; Lunalilo 1 ukana.

The number of servants was over forty per ukana. There were 250 plates, 250 knives, 250 forks, 250 bowls, 250 cups, 150 spoons. And the number of those who ate were probably over 250; there were two prominent haole: Commodore Kearny from the American man-of-war, and the head of the United States warships in East India. Ana Admiral R. Thomas of the British warship, the head of the British warships in the Pacific.

There were four flags raised above the troops while the feast went on: one British flag, one American flag, one French flag, and one Hawaiian flag; and the king’s standard stood near to where the king was.

When the  feast was over, most on foot went back; all together the men, women, and children totaled 2000 or perhaps more. The number of horses were 270, and the riding on the horses on the return was by fours, with two flags and the musicians, while from their mouths came hip hip hurrah [hipi hipi hulo] with great joy all the way until Haliimaile. Written by I. H. Paehewa, Secretary

The Fort. August 5, 1843.

[Anyone know how “ukana” is being used here? Calabash?]

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 29)

"...kou hanohano..."

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 29. Augate 5, 1843.